Concurrent Sessions

Click on times below to learn more about the exciting sessions being presented at AG Bell's 2014 Convention.

Friday, 6/27 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm
Friday, 6/27 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm
Saturday, 6/28 10:30 am - 12:00 pm
Saturday, 6/28 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
Saturday, 6/28 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Sunday, 6/29 10:00 am - 11:30 am
Sunday, 6/29 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm
Sunday, 6/29 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Friday, 6/27
1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

The Magic of Purposeful Play
Louise Honck, Cert. MRCSLT, PGDip. AVT, LSLS Cert. AVT
Rosemary Richardson, Cert. MCRSLT, PGDip. AVT, LSLS Cert. AVT
Learning Track: Education/Clinical Management
This session is designed to share AVUK's methods to equip listening and spoken language professionals and parents of children with hearing loss in using purposeful play as the vehicle for learning, while staying focused on goals for language development. Experience in mentoring and training professionals across the United Kingdom has demonstrated that in putting emphasis on and teaching processionals to work through audition there seems to be a trend that play and fun sometimes go amiss. How to introduce purposeful play in sessions? How to keep learning goals firmly in the forefront while ensuring everyone has fun in the process? This session will equip participants in using purposeful play as the vehicle to drive language development, enabling the child to demonstrate their thinking in play as a joint enterprise. Participants will go home with practical strategies that really work in both clinical and home settings.

Accessible Media in the Post-TV World
Jay Wyant
Michael Hood
Catharine McNally
Learning Track: Technology

 Who needs cable TV anymore? Now many people consume media solely through the internet—streamed onto computers, tablets or even the TV monitor. But wait, there’s no captioning! Or at least it isn’t the same or as reliable as TV captioning. This session explores the various options to accessing streaming media, how to make the most of the captions, and how to advocate for more and better captions..

Complicated Cochlear Implant Cases
Ted Meyer, M.D., Ph.D.
Meredith Holcomb, Au.D., CCC-A
Learning Track: Professional Practice
Although there are typically positive outcomes for children with hearing loss who receive cochlear implants, some cases of pediatric hearing loss are not straightforward and outcomes of cochlear implantation can vary. This session will address the need for a timely and accurate diagnosis of hearing loss in children with multiple involvements, since the process can be difficult and frustrating for both clinicians and families alike. After diagnosis of hearing loss, the child should be referred to a multidisciplinary medical team with a pediatric focus with experience in pediatric hearing loss. The session will discuss several complicated cochlear implant cases, including diagnosis, management options and surgical outcomes. Cases may include children with CHARGE Syndrome, Congenital Cytomegalovirus (CMV), grossly abnormal inner ear abnormalities and those with failed internal devices requiring reimplantation.

I AM GREAT - Building Self Esteem
Ken Levinson, CPA
Learning Track: Living with Hearing Loss
This session will present a model for the development of positive self-esteem and social skills for children and teens who are deaf or hard of hearing. A panel of current and past Leadership Opportunities for Teens (LOFT) counselors will assist in the presentation of the material. The model—I AM GREAT—is an acronym that is easy to remember with each letter representing a key element in the process. Having started the LOFT program in 1996, the presenter has been able to observe many of the characteristics that lead to individuals being able to develop a good sense of who they are and the confidence to advocate for themselves in a variety of situations. This, combined with the vast knowledge and observations of the counselors on the panel, will provide the basis upon which the model will be presented.

Feeling, Dealing, and Healing: The Family's Journey
Mary Beth Goring, M.A., MFT
Learning Track: Communication
Feeling, healing and dealing: the family’s journey co-parenting can be a bumpy road under any circumstances, but when a child is diagnosed with hearing loss, the carefully-mapped route to a couple’s dreams takes a sudden detour into a land of great challenges and risks, as well as intense pride and accomplishment. Parents and siblings alike must make significant changes as they adapt to the needs of the child who has hearing loss. These adaptations are very costly in terms of time, energy and cost to parents, their relationships with each other and their relationships with their children with typical hearing. This session will explore the challenges couples and families face and present tried and true strategies for repairing and strengthening couple relationships, and identifying and meeting siblings’ needs.

Introducing Ponto Plus: The Latest Advances in Wireless Technology and Bone Conduction Sound Processing
Alan Raffauf, M.S.
Learning Track: Partners in Hearing Learning Lab
Bone conduction systems uses have long been limited to the amount of sound processor accessories available to them. Oticon Medical has expanded the treatment options to this population with the introduction of the new Ponto Plus Processors. This presentation will cover the range of direct audio input devices available for bone conduction hearing system users, including new wireless options available with the Ponto Plus processor family.

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Friday, 6/27
3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

A Sound Change: Educating Related-Service Professionals
Cynthia S. Robinson, M.Ed., CED, LSLS Cert. AVEd
Alisa Demico, M.S., CCC-SLP, LSLS Cert. AVT
Learning Track: Communication
Newborn Hearing Screening was legislated throughout the State of Florida in October 2000. While this has led to the early identification of many more children with hearing loss, there continue to be challenges to connecting families to the services they want, particularly when they choose a listening and spoken language outcome. Currently, over 30 percent of children referred at newborn hearing screening are being lost to follow-up. Transforming the future for these young children requires a system of partnership and collaboration. This session will present a program of outreach and education by Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech to increase community awareness about listening and spoken language opportunities for children who are deaf and hard of hearing, using a combination of private grant funding and an existing network of publicly funded early identification and intervention professionals along with professionals in private practice.

Assessing Family Needs, Strengths and Successes
Meredith Knueve Sugar, Esq.
Carianne T. Muse, MPH
Learning Track: Professional Practice
The Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (AG Bell) conducted the Family Needs Assessment (FNA) in an effort to gain insight on the perceptions of families with children who are deaf and hard of hearing on the quality and availability of services received, from both private and public providers. In the same timeframe, the Oberkotter Foundation collected qualitative data to help drive its new strategic initiative to address family needs more directly through its Family Engagement and Outreach (FEO) initiative. Each of these projects yielded compelling revelations about what families experience on their journey towards a successful listening and spoken language outcome for their children with hearing loss. They have also helped both organizations plan for immediate and longer term projects that target those needs, struggles and successes. This presentation will describe the findings of these important research projects and give attendees information about how AG Bell and the Oberkotter Foundation are collaborating to support families in this era of great opportunity for children who are deaf or hard of hearing. 

Evidence-based Data to Support Early Implantation
Teresa Zwolan, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, LSLS Cert. AVT
Ellen Thomas, M.A., CCC-SLP, LSLS Cert. AVT
Learning Track: Technology
Evidence-based data have documented that age of implantation has a profound effect on listening and speech outcomes in children with a cochlear implant. It is important for parents and professionals to understand the outcomes expected for children who receive cochlear implants at various ages. Post-operative speech perception and speech/language data collected on more than 500 children who received a cochlear implant prior to the age of 5 years were examined to develop a description of expected outcomes as a function of age at implant. Tests used to evaluate performance with a cochlear implant will be reviewed and described, and performance of children implanted prior to their 2nd, 3rd, 4th or 5th birthday on these measures will be discussed. The session will also include a discussion of ways to use evidence-based data when counseling families about the time-sensitive nature of this important intervention.

The Interrupting Chicken: Developing Higher-Level Language through Literature
Darcy L. Stowe, M.S., CCC-SLP, LSLS Cert. AVT
Lindsay Hanna, M.S., CCC-SLP, LSLS Cert. AVT
Learning Track: Education/Clinical Management
The development of pragmatic language is considered critical to developing age-appropriate language in children with hearing loss. Frequently, the skills of turn-taking, topic maintenance and the avoidance of interruption, as well as scripts for different conversational partners, are targeted in therapy. This session will present how professionals from Hearts for Hearing in Oklahoma City, Okla., have used the book The Interrupting Chicken by David Ezra Stein as a thought-provoking and language-expanding children’s book that serves to facilitate several listening and language goals into one activity. Presenters will demonstrate how the "interrupting chicken" serves as a spring-board for conversation and language-learning in therapy and beyond. Participants will learn about incorporating higher-level language goals of Theory of Mind, pragmatics (including turn-taking, appropriateness and topic maintenance), story grammar components, inferencing, idioms and multiple meaning words in very meaningful ways through this children’s book and then utilize those tools for carry-over into other children’s literature.

The Breakthroughs Continue—Innovations in Cochleartm Hearing Implants
Abby Connell, Au.D., CCC-A
Learning Track: Partners in Hearing Learning Lab
Discover why more people trust their hearing to Cochlear than all other hearing implant companies. Join us to learn about the latest advances in Cochlear hearing implants for a range of hearing loss. Explore the new features in the Nucleus 6, Nucleus Hybrid, Baha 4 Attract and Baha 4 Connect Systems. Discover how to identify the appropriate hearing solution for various types of hearing loss. Explore wireless accessories and features for at home and in the classroom.


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Saturday, 6/28
10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Skills Underlying Reading Comprehension Ability in Auditory-Verbal Readers
Stacey Lim, CCC-A, Au.D., Ph.D.
Jocelyn Folk, Ph.D.
Stephen Brushighan, M.A.
Lynette Kreidler, B.A. Psych.
Learning Track: Professional Practice
A variety of skills such as word recognition, vocabulary knowledge, syntactic processing and orthographic knowledge comprise overall reading ability. Historically, children with hearing loss have struggled with reading proficiency. However, research has suggested that children with hearing loss who learned language through a listening and spoken language approach are able to develop reading comprehension skills that are similar to their peers with typical hearing. This session will provide an overview of the variety of techniques that have been used to evaluate the cognitive skills used in reading and discuss the strengths and weaknesses in reading comprehension of higher and lower skill readers with hearing loss.

Travel Tips and Emergency Preparedness
Tina Childress, M.A., CCC-A
Learning Track: Technology
What if I don’t hear the gate change? Can I go through the X-ray machine with my cochlear implant? What happens if I get in an accident and I can’t communicate with emergency personnel? What if there’s a fire at the hotel? When you have hearing loss, these concerns are ever-present. This session will discuss different modes of travel, lodging, emergency identification and ways to be safe on the road and at home. Come and discover some strategies for being a savvy traveler!

Balanced Literacy: A Model for Early Intervention
Debbie Schrader, B.S.
Dianne Ganguly-Hammes, M.S., CCC-SLP
Vicki Reynolds, M.S.Ed., Certified Reading Recovery Specialist
Learning Track: Education/Clinical Management
This session will provide participants with an overview of the development and implementation of a Summer Literacy Intervention program. The program was designed to meet the needs of children with hearing loss from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds during the period of emergent literacy development. The session will review the components of research-based balanced literacy and share strategies to support the development of phonological awareness as well as concepts of print and word knowledge. Further, participants will learn about the need to support a metacognitive process related to early literacy development and its application to writing and early literacy reading experiences. The session will review metacognitive instruction for children with hearing loss, a valued component in literacy instruction, including think alouds and question-answer relationships. By teaching developmentally appropriate metacognitive skills to young children, professionals can enhance early literary experiences and empower children to become independent thinkers, readers and writers.

Owning Up: Creating a Culture of Dignity in your School and Classroom
Rosalind Wiseman
Learning Track: Communication
Increasingly students with disabilities are interacting in mainstream educational settings. There are important positive reasons to do so; all children benefit from being around others who are perceived as different and then learning to treat those children with dignity and respect. Inevitably, in any educational environment conflict occurs between children and they need to learn how to handle that conflict effectively but children with disabilities are especially vulnerable to being manipulated or targeted for abuse. This session will teach educators and parents how to identify these dynamics and how to intervene effectively.

Application of Ling's Strategies: A Global Perspective
Dimity Dornan, Ph.D., LSLS Cert. AVT
Learning Track: Education/Clinical Management
This session will illustrate how Professor Daniel Ling’s legacy has transformed the field of listening and spoken language, and how clinical innovators worldwide are adapting his work as a basis for structuring intervention, such as with new hearing technology; populations with low resources, multicultural or multi-language backgrounds, and/or additional disabilities; and various age groups. Ling’s legacy will continue to be transformational into the future, a true “Magic Made Real.” The session will consist of an international panel presentation and roundtable discussion, which will present the panelists' application of innovations to their clinical environments, culture and languages, and in the education of emerging clinicians. Outcomes of a worldwide questionnaire, a summary of current research and future directions for speech development will also be presented.

We The People
Erik Nordlof
Learning Track: Living with Hearing Loss
The Americans with Disabilities Act was a most significant legislative act for people who are deaf and hard of hearing . We celebrate this key part of our heritage that has empowered us over the years. Yet there is always work to do. We still encounter obstacles, and we must engage in activism to remove these obstacles. This session will talk about ways to make a difference at the communal, local, state and even national level. There are organizations and individuals who have sought to make a difference, and we should strive to follow their example. We need to petition for change to transform our future. Join us in this session to gain knowledge and strategies on how to actively engage for positive and lasting change!

An Innovative Rehabilitation Model for Working with Bilingual Families
MaryKay Therres, CCC-SLP, LSLS Cert. AVT
Learning Track: Partners in Hearing Learning Lab
Mounting evidence suggests that children with hearing loss can learn more than one spoken language. Encouraging minority language development neither impairs these children nor prevents them from learning the majority language, given adequate speech perception and an effective immersion process. As long as a child demonstrates adequate speech perception by age 2 using the latest hearing technology, families can take advantage of their child’s critical learning period with the help of appropriate identification and special intervention procedures. This results in unique opportunities to improve services for a growing population of families who do not speak a majority language or speak more than one language and want a bilingual outcome for their children. This session will discuss the issues, challenges and opportunities encountered when children with hearing loss from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds are learning two or more spoken languages, and will introduce resources to support professionals and families in this goal.

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Saturday, 6/28
1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

Listening and Spoken Language (LSL) at the Edges: A Professional Conversation
Teri Ouellette, M.Ed., LSLS Cert. AVEd
Susan Sehgal, M.A., CCC-SLP, LSLS Cert. AVEd
Carrie Tamminga, M.A., CED, LSLS Cert. AVEd
Melissa Seal Shaner, B.S.
Learning Track: Professional Practice
As more families have access to various kinds of amplification technology, especially cochlear implants, and trained listening and spoken language professionals become more available, the conversation about who could benefit from LSL techniques is changing. This session will present several case studies of children in “unusual” situations—children with additional disabilities or very late auditory access, as well as students who may never use “spoken language.” It will illustrate how listening and spoken language techniques can provide benefit and successes for students who might not have previously been considered “candidates.” Come join in the professional conversation, and help us explore the edges of possibility!

deaf with a Small "d": What Does It Mean?
David Davis, B.A, MLIS
Learning Track: Living with Hearing Loss
This session will be a lively discussion among deaf adults on what it means to be deaf with a small "d" against the backdrop of a more visible Deaf community. What similarities and differences do we have in common? How do we assert our beliefs in listening and spoken language while remaining respectful of differing opinions regarding deaf education? Is it possible to communicate those beliefs in a way that will generate respectful understanding from individuals who do not agree with our chosen mode of communication and life in the mainstream?

The Magic of Music: Children with Hearing Loss
Christine Barton, MM, MT-BC
Learning Track: Education/Clinical Management
The advent of sophisticated hearing technology has enabled music to enrich the lives and actively engage many children with hearing loss. In addition, current research highlights the importance of music and music training in the development of spoken language and enhancement for hearing in noise. Recent surveys have revealed that 40 percent of children with hearing loss also have additional disabilities. The prevalence of this population continues to rise. There is evidence to support the use of music therapy for diverse diagnoses and perhaps, even as an intervention for this unique population. Video clips, music experiences and small group interactions will provide attendees with resources to encourage communication and deepen connection with these children.

The "What, Why, What" of Health Literacy
Becky Clem, M.A., CCC-SLP, LSLS Cert. AVT
Learning Track: Professional Practice
What is health literacy? By definition, health literacy is the “ability to read, understand and use health care information to make decisions and follow instructions for treatment” (Ratzan & Parker, 2000). Because families of children with hearing loss (HL) are flooded with copious amounts of information, health literacy is significant to improving outcomes. Health literacy has multiple explanations. This session with share evidence about improving loss to follow-up for newborn hearing screening through a health literacy project using plain language and health literacy friendly materials. Additionally, attendees will view videos of teaching health care professionals to use plain language along with feedback from families.

Social Capital and Students with Hearing Loss
Trudy Smith , LSLS Cert. AVT
Learning Track: Communication
This session will explore the influences of social capital on the developing child with hearing loss. It will bring to light strategies practitioners can use to facilitate healthy social capital. Topics include defining social capital, measuring social capital, understanding individual and collective social capital, the relationship between parental social capital and child social capital, the influences of online social capital, and the role of the practitioner in facilitating social capital. Results of an Australian pilot study titled, “Online and Face-to-face Social Capital, Language and Literacy Skills of Adolescents with Hearing Loss and Their Chronologically-age Matched Hearing Peers” will be reported. All topics are anchored in the context of adolescents with hearing loss.

No Strings Attached—Advances in Wireless Technology for Hearing Implants
Abby Connell, Au.D., CCC-A
Learning Track: Partners in Hearing Learning Lab
The world is shifting towards wireless capabilities, and 2.4 GHz is the frequency used in this shift. Discover how sound can be sent directly to a hearing implant without cords or cables using wireless accessories. Learn how to simplify wireless connectivity and bridge the understanding gap at home and in the classroom. Discover the benefits of Cochlear™ Wireless Accessories and how to optimize them for their environment.

 

Saturday, 6/28
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Parent as Partner
Dave Sindrey, M.Cl.Sc., LSLS Cert. AVT
Learning Track: Professional Practice
What are the characteristics of an effective parent-therapist team? How do we channel less effective partnerships towards this more effective stance? This session will present strategies to assess and strengthen the parent-therapist team with the aim to maximize treatment outcomes for children with hearing loss. Further, attendees will consider common pitfalls in parent-therapist dynamics and how often practitioners' reactions to these pitfalls deepens the pit. This session will give professionals practical and field-tested solutions that target real-life clinical obstacles to empowering and supporting parents. A model for block treatment specifying clear parent expectations will be presented and shared. Strategies for explicit parent goals will be discussed in light of current research on adult learning styles and learning models. This presentation is for those professionals who wish to foster trust, open communication, commitment, accountability and attention to results in the parent-therapist relationship.

Living the Life: Deaf Adult Social
Rachel Arfa, J.D.
Learning Track: Living with Hearing Loss
Join fellow deaf adults for a unique session that will have the tone of a social event and where you will learn about each other and AG Bell! This event features entertaining and interactive presentations led by adults who are deaf, combined with mingling and conversation. You’ll learn fun facts about fellow deaf adults, including what one person loves to geek out on, what one person loves about their cochlear implant(s), a time they felt they failed and what they learned from it, what honorary degree they would gladly accept, something they love about AG Bell, and lots more. The impact of this event is that it helps us learn about each other, and also creates a welcoming environment that allows people to discover more about old pals, while making new friends.

Can you SPEAK UP: Self-advocacy for Students
Brittany Dorn, M.E.D
Ashley Kachelmeyer, M.E.D.
Learning Track: Education/Clinical Management
Advocacy—we hear this buzzword all the time, but do we really know what it means… or more importantly, how do we instill advocacy skills in our students? This session will provide specific examples of IEP-friendly advocacy objectives and demonstrate projects and ideas that have successfully worked with the presenters' own students. Co-presented by two teachers of the deaf, one primarily working with elementary-aged students and another working with high school students, this session will give attendees simple and effective ideas that can be immediately put into practice.

Telepractice Training Protocol-The RIDBC Model
Melissa McCarthy, B.A., M.E.D., LSLS Cert. AVT
Michelle Disbery, B.Teach (EC), Grad.Cert.Ed.Stud., M.Spec.Ed.
Learning Track: Communication
With the rapid development of technologies and the ongoing need for access to appropriate services related to deafness, telepractice has emerged worldwide as a viable alternative to traditional “in-person” service delivery. In Australia, the Royal Institute for Deaf and Blind Children (RIDBC) has been using telepractice for more than 10 years to meet the diverse needs of children who are deaf and hard of hearing and their families. In order to ensure that the quality of services provided via telepractice is equivalent to that of services provided in-person, RIDBC has designed a comprehensive telepractice training protocol. The four-module program addresses topics related to the technology, methodology and pedagogy of working in a telepractice model. The RIDBC training protocol provides a model for supporting practitioners to develop the necessary skills to effectively deliver services via telepractice.

Innovations in Sound Processor Technology for Improved Quality of Life (learning lab)
Carissa Moeggenberg, B.S., M.A.
Learning Track: Partners in Hearing Learning Lab
This session will provide participants with information on the revolutionary advancements seen in cochlear implant technology, which enhance hearing outcomes and directly impact quality of life. Specifically, participants will have a unique opportunity to learn about the newest sound processor from Advanced Bionics. The Naida CI Q70 integrates hearing aid technology with the latest advancements in sound processing into a sleek, lightweight sound processor that offers recipients wireless connectivity options. The benefits and features of the Naida CI Q70 Sound Processor will be presented through instruction, hands-on demonstrations and discussions with recipients who have had the opportunity to use this breakthrough sound processor from Advanced Bionics.

Reviewing Audiologic Test Results to Improve Management
Jane R. Madell, Ph.D.
Carol Flexer, Ph.D.
Learning Track: Technology
Audiologic test results provide significant information about the child’s acoustic access to the brain and the ability of the child to use auditory information for the development of speech, language, listening and literacy skills. This session will use a case review format to assist attendees in learning to evaluate the reliability and validity of audiologic data, use audiologic information to make management decisions, and modify the child’s technology and intervention program as appropriate.

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Sunday, 6/29
10:00 am - 11:30 am

Preparing for and Participating in Your Child's IEP Meeting
Lisa Weiss
Susan Fingerle
Learning Track: Education/Clinical Management
Participating in your child’s IEP meeting can be unnerving. Parents have to ensure that their child’s needs are going to be met while establishing and maintaining a critical relationship with the professionals at their school. This session will present the perspectives, knowledge and experience of two parents, who are also attorneys, who go through the IEP process for their own children with hearing loss and understand the balance that IEP teams need to maintain. They will review what parents can and should do to prepare for IEP meetings. Parents should not feel they have to rely solely on the recommendations of the school district. Even the best district with the best of intentions may not be familiar with the unique needs of a student who is deaf or hard of hearing. Parents need to be able to come to meetings with as much knowledge as possible to fully participate on the IEP team. Topics will include parent advocacy training and education, evaluations, communication plans as part of the IEP, and conflict resolution.

Speech Acoustics for Parents
Lori L. Bobsin, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, LSLS Cert. AVT
Learning Track: Education/Clinical Management
Essential to both early language development and eventual linguistic competence is the ability to perceive and interpret the speech signal. Therefore, understanding what a child with hearing loss can hear with their hearing aid or cochlear implant is an essential skill for parents and the professionals who serve them. A detailed explanation of the acoustics of the speech signal, as well as application exercises and additional resources will be provided. 

Now You Hear Us: Definitely Awesome Teens!
Anna Claire Rech
Alli Emge
Learning Track: Living with Hearing Loss
A panel of high school and college students will share how their hearing loss has impacted them in various facets of their lives by describing how they have developed self-advocacy skills, both academically and socially, found and used the latest assistive listening technologies, and managed socialization issues during high school and through the transition to college, all the while finding their place among their peers with typical hearing. Specifically, they will discuss how they chose their academic tracks and extracurricular activities, worked with their school’s administration, teachers and guidance counselors, prepared for college, and navigated the college application process. They will answer questions relating to their schools’ accommodations, effective ways to communicate their needs to school administrators, teachers and fellow students in the classroom and on campus, and how they have successfully participated in sports, clubs and community involvement.

Navigating Sticky Issues: Jobs and People with Hearing Loss
Rachel Arfa, J.D.
Pauline Newton, Ph.D.
Learning Track: Living with Hearing Loss
Got employment? Now how do you ask for captioning on the job? What if they ask you in your job interview if you can talk on the phone? How do you negotiate your salary? What if your boss thinks your hearing loss will negatively affect your chances for a promotion? This session will answer these and other employment questions. Deaf adults often wonder whether they should disclose their hearing loss in job interviews, and want to know the best strategies for asking for accommodations on the job. The session's presenters, experienced in a variety of employment settings, will share their expertise and will lead the audience through various on-the-job scenarios in order to share meaningful strategies for being successful in the workplace. This discussion will also briefly highlight Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) settlements on employment discrimination cases regarding deaf disability discrimination.

Goals and Activities for Infants and Toddlers
MaryKay Therres, CCC-SLP, LSLS Cert. AVT
Learning Track: Partners in Hearing Learning Lab
Infants and toddlers with hearing loss who are beginning their auditory journey require facilitation to ensure that they develop listening and spoken language skills to the best of their potential. Professionals and parents who are knowledgeable about the progression of communication skills and have a range of purposeful play activities are in a position to provide guided facilitation of skills. This presentation will review several BRIDGE materials from MED-EL designed for use with very young children. The LittlEARS® Auditory Questionnaire assesses the age-appropriate auditory behavior in the preverbal developmental phase or in children who have received a cochlear implant or hearing aids. The LittlEARS® Speech Production Questionnaire measures the speech production development. My LittlEARS® Diary gathers information about early auditory, speech and language development along with providing suggestions for communication development, and the LittlEARS Diary Activities is a supplement that provides additional ideas for purposeful play. Using these materials, short- and long-term goals are easily identified along with play ideas specifically designed to stimulate a child’s communication skills. Participants will learn how to use these materials effectively to determine appropriate goals and activities and will view case study videos.

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Sunday, 6/29
1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Tele-Intervention: Strategies for an Effective Session
Betsy Moog Brooks, M.S.,CED, LSLS Cert. AVEd
Learning Track: Communication
This session will discuss implementing Early Intervention services via tele-therapy sessions, with a main focus on providing ideas and suggestions for coaching parents and primary caregivers via the Internet. Providing quality services to children, to parents and to families can be overwhelming and challenging. The presentation will address Parent Guidance, Education and Support as applied to Listening and Spoken Language Specialists (LSLS®) providing services via tele-intervention. It is essential that professionals learn how to use their existing skills and knowledge to support families via tele-communication. The session will provide professionals with strategies for implementing successful sessions when working with families via the Internet. Techniques for “coaching” parents during activities with their children, in order to enhance communication, will be emphasized. Video segments of tele-therapy will be used to demonstrate skills and techniques.

Application of Ling's Strategies: A Global Perspective
Dimity Dornan, Ph.D. UQ, Hon.D.Univ. USQ, B.Sp.Thy, FSPAA, CpSp, LSLS Cert. AVT
Learning Track: Education/Clinical Management
This session will illustrate how Professor Daniel Ling’s legacy has transformed the field of listening and spoken language, and how clinical innovators worldwide are adapting his work as a basis for structuring intervention, such as with new hearing technology; populations with low resources, multicultural or multi-language backgrounds, and/or additional disabilities; and various age groups. Ling’s legacy will continue to be transformational into the future, a true “Magic Made Real.” The session will consist of an international panel presentation and roundtable discussion, which will present the panelists' application of innovations to their clinical environments, culture and languages, and in the education of emerging clinicians. Outcomes of a worldwide questionnaire, a summary of current research and future directions for speech development will also be presented.

Honey, Read My Lips: Joys and Challenges in Romantic Relationships
Corinne Altman
Learning Track: Living with Hearing Loss
Relationships are a part of our everyday life. Whether you are deaf or hard of hearing, or have a child with hearing loss, or are a professional in the field of deafness, we all deal with relationships. When deafness is added into the already-complicated relationship dynamic, there are issues that need to be addressed. A panel of individuals who are deaf and hard of hearing with romantic lives will share their experiences with attendees. How does hearing loss status affect relationship dynamics? What, if any, struggles do people with typical hearing have that choose to enter the community of people with hearing loss? In what ways has the person who is deaf or hard of hearing strengthened and affirmed a relationship? The panelists will share their own life experiences which promise to bring laughter, insight and maybe a few tears.

Affordable Care Act and Hearing Health Care
Donna L. Sorkin, M.A.
Hannah Eskridge, MSP, LSLS Cert. AVT
Ivette Cejas, Ph.D
Learning Track: Professional Practice
The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) is a federal statute intended to decrease the number of Americans who are uninsured by providing affordable and qualified health benefit plans to individuals and small businesses. An initial assessment of the state Essential Health Benefit plans indicates that most states do cover cochlear implantation. Some cover hearing aids for children. Whether and how all of the insurance products offered on the state exchanges will cover cochlear implants as well as the nature of the coverage is presently unknown. This session will serve as a primer for professionals and parent/consumer advocates who wish to understand the law and its potential for expanding hearing care coverage. State level advocates will learn how to be involved to monitor the ACA rollout and work directly with state insurance officials on hearing care coverage.

 

Explode the App!
Lynn A. Wood, M.A., CCC-A, LSLS Cert. AVT
Dave Sindrey, M.Cl.Sc., LSLS Cert. AVT
Learning Track: Technology
There is no limit to the listening, language and learning possibilities available through apps. Apps are common tools in auditory-verbal practices, clinics, schools and homes. If you own a device that runs apps, you have valuable resources at your fingertips (and at your child’s fingertips too!). This session will present strategies to engage, extend and expand on apps designed to promote vocabulary, listening and language. The presenters will share their favorite apps through themes and/or goals to traditional books, songs, crafts, games and more. The session will provide attendees with ideas for making connections through apps to meaningful conversations and experiences, consider the pros and cons of using apps over traditional materials, and integrate ideas to adopt the benefits of both. Suggestions for “exploding ” the presenters’ favorite apps as well as key factors in choosing apps will be shared and discussed. The format of the session will be interactive using iPad apps, hands-on materials and audience participation.

Developing the Musical Brain to Boost Early Communication and Listening
Valeri Le Beau
Learning Track: Partners in Hearing Learning Lab
This session will focus on how parents can develop early communication and listening skills in babies and infants who are deaf and hard of hearing with hearing aids and cochlear implants through home-based interventions focused on empowering them to support the goals of early intervention best practices. Providing age-appropriate support for newly diagnosed babies and infants with hearing aids waiting for their cochlear implant under the age of 12 months can be challenging. The age of implantation has decreased; therefore, family-centered resources need to fully support the pre-verbal stage. Musical activities can naturally develop the areas of attachment, listening and communication. Research indicates that developing the musical brain also boosts early development of communication skills. For parents and young children, the home provides a natural environment to develop these skills. This session will illustrate the development of a musical, multi-sensory resource and monitoring tool for babies aged 3 months – 24 months that promotes music, listening and early communication. This resource aims to support the natural development of attachment, supporting babies and toddlers to build early developmental skills that are essential for later language development. It aims to bridge the gap between having a hearing aid and waiting for a cochlear implant.

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Sunday, 6/29
3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Lessons from the Battlefield: Deaf Adults Share Their Tips to Success
Jonathan Berger, J.D.
Rachel Arfa, J.D.
Learning Track: Living with Hearing Loss
Growing up with a hearing loss often comes with bumps in the road. One half of the set of tools is to develop and acquire the tools for listening and spoken language, while the other half is learning to adapt to life with a hearing loss in the mainstream along with building self-esteem and confidence. Through this panel, deaf adults will reflect upon their experiences and their paths as individuals with hearing loss, and how they dealt with both triumphant and difficult times.

Holler If You Hear Me
Pnina Bravmann, Au.D., CCC-SLP/A, TSHH, SAS, LSLS Cert. AVT
Elaine Devora Jacobs, Au.D., CCC-A, FAAA
Learning Track: Technology
Classrooms are the primary structured learning environments for children. The ability to hear the teacher and the other students in a classroom is a necessity for every child. Success in a classroom environment is dependent on a number of factors. One of the keys is classroom design and acoustic accessibility for all students. Poor acoustics in classrooms create barriers to learning, and contribute to excessive noise, reverberation and low speech-to-noise signals. All children require an improved signal-noise ratio for optimal learning; however, children with all degrees of hearing loss require a better signal-noise ratio for optimal learning, and have an increased risk of experiencing academic difficulties in challenging listening environments. This session will demonstrate ideal classroom acoustic design as well as modifications that can be made in challenging listening environments. Advocacy recommendations for the student, parent, classroom teacher and professionals on the child’s team will be presented and discussed.

Game On! Sports and Cochlear Implants
Kristin Matta, B.A., M.A.
Jennifer Kyzer, B.A.
Learning Track: Technology
Children with cochlear implants face unique challenges when they take to the court, the field or the gym to play organized sports. What are those challenges and how can children with cochlear implants overcome them? In this session, attendees will meet middle school and high school athletes who use cochlear implants, their parents and a coach who uses a cochlear implant who all have found creative ways to achieve success in a variety of sports. The presentation will focus on the important role that sports can play in a child’s life and will share specific strategies that children with cochlear implants, their families and coaches have developed to encourage participation, minimize risks and foster success (including a wealth of new information submitted by members of the cochlear implant community). Much research has been done to identify the physical, social and emotional benefits of playing sports but what do children with cochlear implants really think? Attendees will have the opportunity to learn about the benefits of playing sports directly from experienced athletes with cochlear implants in their own words.

A Multidisciplinary Approach to Management of Children with Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder (ANSD)
Shelly Ash, M.S.
Anne Oliver, M.A.
Learning Track: Education/Clinical Management
Infants and children diagnosed with hearing loss secondary to Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder can be a very challenging population for audiologists, speech-language pathologists and physicians to manage. Decisions regarding treatment such as amplification, cochlear implants, language therapy and medical tests are often complicated by variances in auditory performance and language development as well as coexisting medical conditions and health issues. Children with ANSD are in need of close monitoring and this is best achieved using a team approach. This session will address the roles of the aforementioned professionals as they contribute towards multidisciplinary management of children with ANSD.

Sounds to Words: How the Brain Hears
Lydia Denworth
Learning Track: Education/Clinical Management
Sound triggers a cascade of responses in the hearing brain that affect how children learn spoken language and then go on to read. Neuroscientists now understand quite a lot about what happens in this process. This presentation will explain what is known about the connection between audition and brain development and how it relates to children with hearing loss. It will describe the interplay of innovative ideas that contributed both to the creation of cochlear implants and to knowledge about brain plasticity. Discussion will include how the auditory system connects the ears to the brain, what cognitive differences might exist between children with and without hearing loss due to different experiences of sound, and how learning to read changes the brain. Parents and professionals will come away with a deeper understanding of the path from the ear to the brain, from sounds to words.

Making Conversations Happen: A Framework and Practical Tools for Teaching
Ann Holmes
Learning Track: Partners in Hearing Learning Lab
This session focuses on a classroom-tested framework for teaching developed an implemented at Central Institute for the Deaf in St. Louis, Mo. Learn about our new and revised assessment and tracking tools, all with a familiar ratings system standardized for ease of use. Our goal is to meet the specific practical needs for speech-language pathologists and teachers helping children develop listening, speech and language skills in the context of the whole child. This presentation includes a preview of some of CID’s new line of continuing education, self-study webinars for professionals.

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